The NAACP Building Was Bombed And Police Announced That It Could Be Domestic Terrorism

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The NAACP Building Was Bombed And Police
Announced That It Could Be Domestic Terrorism  
BHR Hollywood Reports..............A disturbing development is being reported from Colorado Springs, Colorado, as a local NAACP office was bombed last night.

 Authorities stated that someone placed an improvised explosive device next to a can of gasoline in the hop
es of causing massive damage to the building and office.

The bomb did explode but the gas did not ignite, and the d
amage was minimal.

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Police Investigating NAACP Bombing
Police are now looking for a suspect who is described as a balding white male, driving a late model white pickup truck with partially obscured plates.

No one has claimed responsibility for the attack, but with racial tensions rising across the country, it is feared that there could be a potential for copycat bombings.

During the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, churches and NAACP offices were bombed throughout the South.

 In Birmingham, Alabama, the bombings were so frequent, the city was called “Bombing-ham” by many.
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Colorado Springs

One bombing at the 16th Street Baptist Church in 1963 killed four little black girls as they were preparing to sing in the choir.

A homemade explosive was detonated Tuesday morning against an exterior wall of a building that houses the NAACP Colorado Springs chapter as well as Mr. G's Hair Design Studios, a local barbershop.

There were no deaths or injuries from the explosion and only minimal surface damage was done to the wall where the explosion occurred, but chapter president Henry Allen Jr. said the blast was strong enough to knock objects off the wall.

The FBI's Joint Terrorism Task Force was leading the investigation into the explosion, but the Colorado Springs Police and the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives have also been involved.

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NAACP Building
Longtime civil rights leader Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) tweeted on Wednesday that he was "deeply troubled by the bombing in Colorado."

"It reminds me of another period," Lewis added. "These stories cannot be swept under the rug."

For decades, the NAACP has stood up to violence, frequently brought on it from white supremacist groups like the Ku Klux Klan.

 Bombings of NAACP offices were common during the 1960s in some southern U.S states.

 In Alabama, the city of Birmingham was sometimes called "Bombingham" due to a wave of bombings that targeted black homes and churches, including the 1963 Birmingham church bombing that killed four African-American girls.



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